As airplane makers struggle to meet demand, Morocco wants to become a manufacturing hub

(23 Apr 2024)
MOROCCO AVIATION

SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

RESTRICTION SUMMARY:

LENGTH: 4:44

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Casablanca, Morocco – 17 April 2024

1. Various of CFM56 aircraft engines inside Safran factory
2. Safran factory exterior
3. Close of Safran sign on factory exterior
4. Various of Memorandum of Understanding signing ceremony between Royal Air Maroc and Safran Aircraft Engines by Abdelhamid Addou, chairman of the board and CEO of Royal Air Maroc, and Jean-Paul Alary, CEO of Safran Aircraft Engines
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdelhamid Addou, chairman of the board and CEO, Royal Air Maroc:
“There is a market today. Today, the global international supply chain is suffering. Morocco has a good opportunity and a good positioning in terms of the aeronautical industry. Secondly, our human resources are very strong here with very good capabilities. And third, we are very close to Europe. I mean, it’s an hour flight, two hour flight, to reach every European capital, so it’s very close. For all those reasons, it can only work.“

6. Various of technicians working inside factory
7. Display showing airlines that work with Safran Aircraft Engines
8. Board showing authorities approvals
9. Various of Moroccan Minister for Transport and Logistics, Mohammed Abdeljalil giving speech
10. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Mohammed Abdeljalil, Moroccan Minister for Transport and Logistics:
“This industry is based on all the requirements needed by an investor in Morocco, mainly for the human resources required. Morocco is doing all it could to satisfy investors with their needs for qualified human resources.”

11. Various of technicians working inside factory
12. Various of display showing carbon emissions reduction plan
13. SOUNDBITE (French) Jean-Paul Alary, CEO, Safran Aircraft Engines:
“It’s the access to well qualified talents who have been well trained. They are the key players for achieving our goals to rise in competence. The second reason is the support of the government and all the instances and agencies here in Morocco. Finally, it is also a matter of confidence between men and women.”

14. Various of entrance to institute specializing in aeronautics and airport logistics
15. Various of two Royal Air Maroc aircraft being repaired near Safran plant
STORYLINE:
LEADIN:

Moroccan officials are aiming to turn the country into an aviation hub, luring investors aiming to spread out their supply chains to more nations with available and affordable workers.

The North African nation is vying for contracts with big manufacturers aiming to speed up production and deliver more planes to meet demand.

STORYLINE:

In Morocco, efforts to grow the country’s $2 billion-a-year aerospace industry are part of a years-long push to transform the largely agrarian economy through subsidizing manufacturers of planes, trains, and automobiles.

Officials hope it dovetails with efforts to grow Moroccan airlines, including the state-owned Royal Air Maroc.

“There is a market today. Today, the global international supply chain is suffering. Morocco has a good opportunity and a good positioning in terms of the aeronautical industry," says Royal Air Maroc CEO Abdelhamid Addou.

Safran Aircraft Engines sends Boeing 737s and Airbus 320s to a repair plant outside of Casablanca every six to eight years and then sends them back to airlines from countries including Brazil, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom, and Ireland.

“Morocco is doing all it could to satisfy investors with their needs for qualified human resources," says Mohammed Abdeljalil, Morocco’s Minister for Transport and Logistics.

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